josh (joshc) wrote,
josh
joshc

catalog

danah boyd has an article on Salon about Six Apart buying LiveJournal.
It is the intimacy of friends, family and people-like-me that LiveJournal has fostered. When Six Apart bought LiveJournal, it did not simply purchase a tool -- it bought a culture. LJ challenges a lot of assumptions about blogging, and its users have different needs. [salon]

It's a nice companion [mainstream translation] to her weblog post about cultural differences between the two companies written while the sale was still internet rumor [apophenia]. For me, LiveJournal hasn't been about subculture participation. Unless it's the subculture of people who move to new cities and find themselves with a lot of free time two write about their day-to-day life. Or about people who want to hang out at a certain bar on a Monday night, for instance. Or people who write things on the internet in general, which despite 2004 as the YoTB, is still probably a minority phenomenon. Nevertheless, it has turned out to be a great and extremely compelling way to keep in touch.

My only "real" experience with LJ as subculture has been a throwaway mildly mock disapproving/apologetic comment after being introduced as a LJ person during an unexpected run-in with blogging "A-listers" at the WTC lightshow. And if anything, this was about LJ as a weblogging subculture rather than a societal one. Still, I'm grateful that someone is posting thoughtful commentary about the importance of LiveJournal as something more than a teen angst device. I'm also sort of jealous that she's able to make a career out of this kind of fascinating research.
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