?

Log in

No account? Create an account

September 5th, 2004

elephant

the long weekend (sun)

Sunday was my first day of Bumbershoot and I started the afternoon by seeing some snake bands. In particular These Arms Are Snakes and Cobra High. I think TAAS > CH, but they're not really extremely similar except for their serpentine obsessed names.
[special note: The worst Bumbershoot venue in the whole world (Exhibition Hall) seemed less horrible this time year.]

Much like last year, I ♥ Flatstock; however unlike last year I didn't buy anything moslty because my walls are already full of posters and my wallet is nearing empty. I did find out that one of my Shins posters is now part of a $95 two-piece set. This revelation was cool, yet made me feel stupid for not buying both posters for cheap when I had the opportunity.

In general, I enjoyed the other visual art components of the festival too, particularly the Aperture retrospective, a graffiti collection, and a cluster of experiential pieces.

Despite the warnings (lies!) of the crowd control who said that it would be hopeless, I stood in the very long line to see Ben Kweller and got to see much of the show, including a highly entertaining freestyle rap when some equipment malfunctioned. I really enjoyed being excited about seeing this, and should've realized that there would be a crowd by all of the teens wearing the simple Ben Kweller t-shirts. At Bumbershoot, I always have this weird sense of sympathy when the band plays their known song, because that's all that most of the people want to hear. They saw a big line, waited, and then they get to hear the song about sex reminding her of of spaghetti and they're happy; so the band holds off on playing that song until the end. On one hand, it's great for the artists to have a well-known song that random festival attendees want to hear, but it must be kind of a complicated feeling. Maybe not.

Rather than making the impossible choice between Public Enemy and the Walkmen, I took Neal Pollack's advice [thestranger] and saw the Pollack-Hodgeman (of former literary agent fame) Interviews. They were funny, probably not technically better than the musical offering, but were much better in terms of my tired feet.